Article 13

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"EU Copyright Enforcement, because our money matters more than your freedom!"

"I understand everyone's burned out over #netneutrality, SOPA, and other battles, but this has a more dire impact on how we use the web than anything else--and unlike laws in the US, it can't be challenged or reversed easily."

Ian Miles Cheong


The EU Copyright Directive Article 17 is a controversial anti-online piracy law that has been proposed and approved by the European Parliament in March 2019 that requires anyone with ability to publish content to maintain a database of copyrighted works that were claimed by right's holders.

Much like the infamous SOPA, it's in essential a mass censorship law that can potentially put memes, remixes and user generated content to an end in Europe, as it requires online platforms such as Google, Facebook, YouTube (post-2013) and Twitter to automatically censor copyrighted content uploaded by anyone who isn’t licensed to share it.

It was planned to be voted in on July 5th, only to be voted against successfully. It was pushed back to September and back to the concept board, where it was then passed. In March 2019, it was passed for the last time by the EU.

Why It's Rotten

  1. Much like SOPA, some of Article 17 (previously 13)'s requirements are rather vague, such as the usage of "appropriate measures" and "effective content recognition technologies" which it never clearly defined. Vague and poorly-defined laws means that it can easily be misinterpreted (intentionally or not) and abused.
    • Speaking of "content recognition technologies", anyone who's familiar with YouTube's notorious copyright strike system knows that these algorithms never work properly. Meaning that many people on major online platforms can be framed for nothing.
    • Human monitors, while far more reliable, may prove to be too costly for companies to deploy, so its more likely that they will relay on the shoddier but cheaper method.
  2. The strict copyright management makes it far easier for trolls and online hate mobs to silence people.
  3. While it's passed its General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) law, internet users from other nations can also be negatively effected, depending on if the website wants to keep running in the EU.
  4. What's worse is that the musicians praise this act, because they believe it's helping against piracy and copyright infringement because of AI algorithms.
  5. Once the law is to be executed strictly, many major online platforms or media outlets may as well pull out from Europe because platforms that can’t handle monitoring may loose millions in penalties and simply go bankrupt, restricting online resources for people of the EU even further.
  6. Not only the robust meme culture, but also pop culture-based media such as Let's Plays, trailer reactions, live streaming, reviews, critiques or fan art sharing can be severely impacted.
  7. Other laws that are just as terrible would also be started as well:
    • Article 3 would create a copyright exception when used for Text and Data Mining research methods for research institution and only for the purpose of scientific research. This pretty much prevents independent researchers, journalists and companies to use the technique for products and services.
    • Article 15 would require extra copyrights for news or media outlets, requiring anyone who would like to link to a news site must first get a license from the publisher (in other words, pay a fee). This can deliver a fatal blow to smaller and newer publishers, and can even boost the spread of fake news due to restricted channels. For example, Spain tried that once, and as a result, Google News was forced to pull out of Spain, because nobody wants "link tax".
  8. The law itself bans memes altogether (since parodies infringe on copyright in this law). EU once tweeted that it does the opposite: embraces memes.
  9. They want YouTube dead so the world can be "a better place."

The Only Redeeming Quality

  1. It doesn't apply to every country or even the United States of America (only in the European countries that are in the European Union), so as with the Great Firewall, you can bypass it with a VPN.

Update

The European Parliament has voted to reject a new copyright directive, which includes the particularly controversial Article 13. The proposed law was rejected by 318 votes to 278, with 31 abstentions. The EU's copyright reforms has been debated in September and successfully passed. Finally, on March 26, 2019, the European Parliament voted on Article 17, 348 in favor and 274 against.

Videos

Comments


avatar

Seanbuscus2600

22 months ago
Score 0
O O F
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Breakin' Benny

22 months ago
Score 0
It's not looking good here...
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PeterPhantom

22 months ago
Score 0
So, does this means that Article 13 is ready to be enforced?
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PeterPhantom

21 months ago
Score 0
I feel bad for the Europeans.
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ThereIsNoUsername

22 months ago
Score 1
What's next for the internet if the memes are gone? :C
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Maxkatzur

21 months ago
Score 0
I'm Russian btw.
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TehSmile

21 months ago
Score 0
At least Russian internet censorship can be bypassed via VPN or Opera Turbo. (though bypassing it is illegal, lol)
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KaiSmithMiraheze

17 months ago
Score 0
Yup,we are safe from this crap so far.
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OpenRISC

20 months ago
Score 0
and,no memes anymore
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Master Chief

18 months ago
Score 1
Thanos snaps half of the internet in Europe out of existence and gets grounded
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Eaglebee2356

16 months ago
Score 1
Well this is a brink of civil war
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SkyBlueYoshi

15 months ago
Score 0
So basically it's about the money
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Maxkatzur

15 months ago
Score 1
Youtube Content ID abusers, like Sony Music, Universal Music, Warner Music had ILLEGALLY gained over $2 billion dollars.
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Glitchedblood

11 months ago
Score 2
Good thing I don't live in the UK
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Botbuster

11 months ago
Score 0
Bad for me, since I'm British, also bad for other Europeans, although it seems it isn't talked about much now.
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Maxkatzur

11 months ago
Score 0
I wonder if UK left European Union as an answer to complaints on Article 13, especially the Article 11.
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Backman

10 months ago
Score 0
I'm Nordic and thus, in the area of European Parliament. This law is basically a major insult upon Internet users who deserve none of this.
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Neon F.

8 months ago
Score 0
This only spawned more meme war memes in the USA
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Maxkatzur

8 months ago
Score 0
Any new updates tot his article?
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Nitesh Surya Vanapalli

7 months ago
Score -2
"EU Copyright Enforcement, because our money matters more than your freedom!"
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Rockman138

6 months ago
Score 0
Thank God I'm in America, at least America won't get Article 13. But despite the UK also being a European country, that country left the EU, so would Article 13 happen in the UK as well? I sure as Hell hope not.
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Lesther110

4 months ago
Score 0
Prime example on why old people should stay away from internet when it comes to this.
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Master Chief

4 months ago
Score 0
What ever happened to this? people where freaking out about it back in 2018.
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Lesther110

4 months ago
Score 0
I think it was shut down privately.
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Fomantisboy35

4 months ago
Score -1
Article 13, Friday the 13th, 13 reasons why! Why are there so many bad things with the number 13?! (And no, I won't take 13 is an unlucky number as an answer). What about Pokemon 13? (Oh, Weedle. That's not so bad...)
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LuigiMan050-5

11 days ago
Score 0
It's our job to hide our content, not yours, Article 13.

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